Search results for: "venting and flaring"

Twitter / Western Colorado Congress

A rally in Colorado to support the Obama administration’s last-minute restrictions on energy development on federal lands drew only a handful of protestors in a setback for anti-oil and gas groups. The April 18 event in Grand Junction, Colo. was supposed to show support for the “venting and flaring” rule, issued by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) in the final months of the Obama administration. But only a dozen protestors showed up, according to the Grand Junction Daily Sentinel.

Shutterstock / Jiri Flogel

Texas Attorney General Ken Paxton (R) has joined a federal lawsuit seeking to overturn the Obama administration’s “venting and flaring” rule, issued late last year, which targets oil and natural gas development on federal lands. Paxton’s intervention means four states – Texas, North Dakota, Wyoming and Montana – are now in federal court trying to strike down the rule imposed by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management in November. Western officials are also leading a separate effort to repeal the venting and flaring rule in Congress. “This is yet another case of gross federal overreach,” Paxton said in a statement to Western Wire.

Marchers take part in the Global Climate March in Washington, DC By Rena Schild

Shutterstock / Rena Schild

Environmental activist groups are pulling out all the stops to save the Obama administration’s last-minute “venting and flaring” rule, which targets oil and natural gas development on federal lands. Unfortunately for them, however, that means shining a spotlight on their real agenda and who pays for it. And it turns out groups arguing in favor of the methane rule, claiming it will increase natural gas production and tax revenues, have close ties to anti-oil and gas organizations and the “keep it in the ground” campaign.

Albuquerque New Mexico downtown aerial view.

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New Mexico business leaders are pushing back against a campaign led by environmental activists to save a last-minute regulation from the Obama administration targeting oil and natural development. The New Mexico Business Coalition says the “venting and flaring” rule imposed late last year “clouds the regulatory environment” for one of the state’s most important industries. The rule, finalized by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management (BLM) two months before President Barack Obama left office, adds to existing state and federal regulations that limit methane emissions. “An ax, not a scalpel, is needed on BLM’s venting and flaring rule,” the group says.

Flickr / Earthworks

Activists who oppose oil and natural gas development have launched a new campaign to save a last-minute Obama administration regulation that’s facing repeal in the U.S. Senate. The Western Leaders Network is trying to defend the “venting and flaring” rule, issued by the U.S. Bureau of Land Management two months before President Barack Obama left office. The group is led by Mark Pearson, board secretary of the San Juan Citizens Alliance (SJCA), and Gwen Lachelt, a former Earthworks activist who now serves as a commissioner in La Plata County, Colo. The SJCA has previously admitted using “street fight” tactics to make oil and gas “as difficult as possible to develop,” and Earthworks has said it’s engaged in a “war on fracking.”

Colorado Business Roundtable

One of Colorado’s top business leaders is calling on the U.S. Senate to swiftly repeal a last-minute regulation from the Obama administration targeting oil and natural gas development on federal lands. Jeff Wasden, president of the Colorado Business Roundtable, says using the Congressional Review Act to overturn the so-called “venting and flaring” rule is a pro-growth move that will help the economy, encourage energy development, create jobs and boost tax revenues in the West.

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The new EPA greenhouse gas inventory is particularly timely, because Congress is weighing whether to use the Congressional Review Act to overturn the Obama administration’s “venting and flaring” rule. The rule purports to reduce methane emissions from oil and natural gas production on federal public lands.